Driving While License Revoked? We can help!

driving-no-license-revoked

Just ignoring a revoked or suspended North Carolina license will not make the problem go away. In fact, by ignoring it you could be put in jail if you are pulled over for any reason.  Are you aware that a charge of driving while license revoked or suspended is much more serious than other moving violations? In some situations, the consequences of this charge can include jail time, in addition to further driver's license restrictions and huge hike in your car insurance rates.  You have the option of fighting these charges, and the Law Offices of Wiley Nickel, PLLC can help. 

We have experience fighting traffic tickets in Wake County and know how to navigate through the system.  We know the steps that need to be taken to help you minimize or avoid the consequences of charges of driving while license revoked or suspended.

Just Paying Your Ticket Off Is A Bad Option

The severity of these charges means that you cannot just send in payment for your fine and hope that’s the end of it.  You either have to appear in person at court or have a lawyer appear on your behalf.  We can guide you through the North Carolina court system and the very complex world of the North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles. You can count on us to either stand by your side or appear on your behalf.

Why Did I Get A DWLR Charge?

Many circumstances come into play when charged with driving while license revoked (DWLR) in Wake County and throughout North Carolina.  Your North Carolina driver’s license could be revoked due to:

·         unpaid court costs

·         failure to appear in court on a different case

·         failure to appear in court in a different county in North Carolina

·         paying off a severe speeding ticket without getting it reduced

·         two (2) speeding convictions over 55 mph within one (1) year

·         driving while impaired (DWI)

·         accumulating twelve (12) DMV points within three (3) years

·         accumulating eight (8) DMV points within three (3) years, if you have had a past license revocation

Effects of a DWLR

Pleading guilty to a driving while license suspended charge will suspend your driving privilege for an additional year. Driving While License Revoked (DWLR) is a serious criminal charge that can impact both your financial future and your driving privilege. It is a Class 3 Misdemeanor if committed after December 1, 2013 and comes with a potential sentence of up to 20 days in jail. It is defined by statute at N.C.G.S 20-28(a). Additionally, it carries eight (8) insurance points, causing a 190% increase in insurance rates for three (3) years. Depending on the facts it may be possible to secure a reduction or even a dismissal. There is hope if you have a DWLR ticket. Call a suspended license attorney in our office to review your case.

New Changes In The Law for DWI related DWLR

Driving while your license was suspended or revoked prior to December 1, 2013 is still a Class 1 Misdemeanor.  If you were charged after 12/1/2013 then it is a lower class 3 misdemeanor.  However there is a new crime of Driving While License is Revoked for DWI.  This new crime is a Class 1 misdemeanor.  While prosecutors are going easier on people charged with DWLR they are much tougher on those charged with driving with a revoked license for a DWI offense.  If you are charged with driving with a revoked license that was suspended for DWI you could be facing up to 120 days in jail, a revocation of probation and a host of problems getting a valid license again. 

If you were charged with Driving While License Revoked, call The Law Offices of Wiley Nickel, PLLC for a free consultation. Attorney Wiley Nickel and Attorney Kristi Haddock are available by phone at 919-585-1486 or by email at wiley@wileynickel.com or kristi@wileynickel.com. Our office is located just of interstate 40 in Cary, NC. 

Comment

Wiley Nickel

Wiley Nickel lives and works in Cary, North Carolina. In 1998, he graduated from Tulane University with a major in Political Science and a minor in History. After college Wiley went to work for Al Gore and travelled with the Vice President as part of his national advance staff. Following the Gore campaign he earned his law degree from the Pepperdine University School of Law in 2005. While in law school Wiley worked as a law clerk in the Ventura County District Attorney’s Office where he gained valuable criminal trial experience before taking and passing the California bar exam. His first job out of law school was for the Merced County District Attorney’s Office where he worked as a Deputy District Attorney with a focus on prosecuting DWI offenders. Wiley later joined the Law Offices of Joseph Uremovic where he focused on civil litigation and family law. When the opportunity came to join the Obama campaign in 2008 Wiley jumped at the chance. He spent three years travelling with President Obama as a member of his national advance team. In 2011 Wiley left his work for the White House to return to the practice of law. Wiley devotes the majority of his practice to the areas of criminal law, family law, traffic tickets and DMV issues. The Law Offices of Wiley Nickel was started with the goal of providing the best representation possible for all of his clients. Experienced, Compassionate, Aggressive Criminal Defense While defense attorney Wiley Nickel works as the primary attorney for all of his cases, he does have an associate attorney, a team of investigators, forensic consultants, and support staff to call on to help achieve the best possible result in every case. He limits his case load so that he can focus on providing the best possible legal defense to all of his clients. Every case is a top priority and the goal is to have your case dismissed with a focus on being able to expunge your charges at the end of the process. When he is not working, Wiley is an avid family man, distance runner and golfer. He loves North Carolina college sports and is hoping this is the year for Cam Newton and the Carolina Panthers. Wiley is licensed to practice law in North Carolina and California.